Medications for fear & anxiety

This recorded webinar by Dr. Lore Haug on treating behavioral challenges with medications is a must-see for anyone considering, or resisting, the use of medications.

The field of behavioral medications for dogs has advanced in the past few years. Research has shown that many of the same medications that help humans brains deal with behavioral challenges (fears, anxiety, aggression, obsessive compulsive disorders, etc.), also work with dogs. If you are exploring the option of medications to help your fearful dog this study on anti-depressants gives insights into why and how they can be effective for changing our dog’s behavior.

Many dogs don’t need medications, as much as they need consistent training and exercise, but for others the benefits of the appropriate medication are huge. Talk to a trainer and a vet to determine if medications are an option for your dog. You’ll want to run blood tests to be sure that your dog’s body can handle long term use of a medication. And remember, the use of medication alone will not change your dog’s behavior! The meds will make it easier for your dog to learn the new skills and behaviors you will continue to teach it.

This article, Dealing with Canine Anxiety, contains a good overview of ways to treat dogs suffering from anxiety and phobias.

The ASPCA has added some useful info on behavioral medications. This article on the DogAware.com website provides a good over view.

The Mayo Clinic
National Institute of Mental Health

Dr. Karen Overall’s overview of behavioral medications.

Behavioral Medications
Alprazolam (Xanax)
Amitriptyline (Elavil)
Buspirone (Buspar)
Clomipramine (Clomicalm)-NOTE-Novartis is suspending production of this medication in early 2012, the date to resume production to be determined. Consult with your vet about alternatives. In January 2012 they also warned of foreign tablets being found in bottles of Clomicalm.
Clorezepate (Tranxene)
Fluoxetine (Prozac)-This medication labeled as Reconcile for vet use may no longer be available.
Diazepam (Valium)
Imipramine (Tofranil)
Paroxetine (Paxil)
Selegiline (Deprenyl, Aniprul)
Sertraline (Zoloft)
Diphenhydramine
Phenylpropanolamine
Propranolol
NOTE: This list does not indicate a recommendation of the product for your pet! Do your homework and research and talk to your vet.

Some of the medications listed above require several weeks of use before you can expect to see any changes in a dog’s behavior. Others can be used on an ‘as needed’ basis. It’s important to follow the protocol outlined by a veterinarian when starting or stopping medications. Always check with a vet before giving your dog ANY herbal or other supplement in addition to a prescription medication. Caution should also be used when giving any over-the-counter product. Just because a substance may be ‘natural’ does not mean that it cannot have potentially deadly effects.

Patty Khuly VMD addresses the use of acepromazine in this article.

This article by Terry Kelly talks about medications that you should NOT use with a fearful dog.

Excerpt from a Dr. Karen Overall lecture regarding acepromazine

If you have concerns about using medications to help your dog you may find the following blog posts thought-provoking.

Pill Popping

Medications For Fearful Dogs

Thoughts On Medications

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