seaglassStrolling a beach who can help but be pleased to find a piece of sanded smooth seaglass?  With the sharp edges worn down to safety they are tiny treasures used to make jewelry. Bathrooms around the world contain baskets of the stuff gathered during vacations and holidays. Even with their shiny surface blurred by abrasion we rarely resist the urge to put a piece in our pocket.

As I pick up stones to toss into the lake for my dogs I set aside ones rounded to lozenge-shaped smoothness. My childhood friends and I would covet these kinds of rocks, sharing them with special friends the way teenagers now share friendship bracelets or rings. What is it about these stones that, even as an adult, I find irresistible? Why is something that was once irregular with sharp edges, more appealing now that it has been tumbled and had those edges refined?

Sunny is my seaglass. Once he might have been considered by many to be a broken shard, without Black & white dog looking quizzicalworth, destined for the trash heap. But with his edges smoothed he’s one of my most valued treasures. A rare piece of red or blue glass that has put in its time tumbling in the sand and ended up all the more beautiful for it.